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вт, 31 дек.

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Armenia

New Year (AMANOR)

Amanor, also known as the Armenian New Year, is celebrated on January 1st in Armenia, aligning with the Gregorian calendar. However, the traditions and customs surrounding this holiday are rich and unique, reflecting Armenia's ancient history and cultural heritage.

New Year (AMANOR)
New Year (AMANOR)

Время и место

31 дек. 2024 г., 23:50 – 02 янв. 2025 г., 23:50

Armenia

О событии

Amanor, also known as the Armenian New Year, is celebrated on January 1st in Armenia, aligning with the Gregorian calendar. However, the traditions and customs surrounding this holiday are rich and unique, reflecting Armenia's ancient history and cultural heritage.

Historical Background

Amanor has its roots in ancient pagan traditions, where it was originally celebrated on Navasard, the first month of the ancient Armenian calendar, which corresponds to August. This celebration was dedicated to the Armenian god Amanor, the deity of the New Year and harvest, symbolizing renewal and new beginnings.

Modern Celebrations

Today, Armenians celebrate Amanor with a blend of modern and traditional practices. Here are some key aspects of the celebrations:

Preparations
  • Cleaning and Decorating: Homes are thoroughly cleaned and decorated with festive ornaments, lights, and often a Christmas tree, known as a "New Year Tree" in Armenia.
  • Food: A central part of the celebration is the preparation of a lavish feast. Traditional dishes include dolma (stuffed grape leaves), ghapama (stuffed pumpkin), various meats, salads, and pastries like gata and pakhlava.
New Year's Eve
  • Family Gathering: Families come together to celebrate on New Year's Eve. It's a time for reunions, reflecting on the past year, and making wishes for the new one.
  • Midnight Celebration: At the stroke of midnight, fireworks light up the sky, and people exchange greetings, hugs, and gifts. The atmosphere is filled with joy and optimism for the year ahead.
Traditions and Customs
  • Fortune Telling: Some families engage in traditional fortune-telling practices, predicting what the new year will bring.
  • Visiting Relatives and Friends: In the days following January 1st, it is customary to visit relatives and friends, bringing with them sweets and gifts as tokens of good luck and prosperity.
Symbols
  • Pagagh (New Year Bread): A special bread called "pagagh" is baked, sometimes containing a coin inside. Finding the coin in your piece is considered a sign of good luck.
  • Santa Claus (Dzmer Pap): Similar to Western traditions, a figure resembling Santa Claus, known as Dzmer Pap (Grandfather Winter), brings gifts to children.
Cultural Significance

Amanor is a time for Armenians to honor their cultural traditions while embracing the new. It represents a period of renewal, joy, and hope, with a strong emphasis on family, hospitality, and community. The celebrations reflect the resilience and spirit of the Armenian people, blending ancient customs with contemporary practices.

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